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Vana Grimoire: Mabon

In the Vana Grimoire series, we share tips and background information on pagan festivals, recipes, mythologies, history, and other worth-knowing subjects that are related to our events. In this blog, we will dive into the pagan festival Mabon.

Every year around September 21st, the autumn equinox takes place. In 2021 it is on Wednesday, September 22nd. Just like with the spring equinox during Ostara, day and night will be of the same length. On this day, we celebrate the second harvest festival, Mabon. We are again grateful for the harvest that Mother Nature grants us.

The Harvest Festivals

The first harvest festival was Lughnasadh in August, during which the first wheat harvest came in. Now it's time for Mabon. While we feasted in abundance during Lughnasadh, this festival is a bit different. We will be mindful and help this harvest prepare us for what will come. It will help us through the winter. This is the time of apples, grapes, and pumpkins. 
After Mabon, only one harvest festival will follow, Samhain, at the end of October.

Find balance

Mabon is about finding balance. It reflects in nature. Autumn arrives and nature will let go of what it no longer needs. It's a good moment to follow her lead and declutter and clean your home for the colder months to come. But don't forget to take a moment and find the balance within yourself as well. Take a moment to appreciate your successes and let go of what no longer helps you.

Celebrating Mabon

Let's bring that cozy feeling into your home! The oncoming months will be cold and dark, so it's time to make sure your house is comfortable. Decorate with dried fruit and herbs to spread lovely smells around your home. Use seasonal fruits and vegetables in your favorite recipes. Enjoy a nice bonfire with your friends in your garden. Or bring the light in by placing candles around your house. 

There are eight Celtic holidays. In our Vana Grimoire, we like to get you acquainted with them. You can read more about them in our blogs about Imbolc, Beltane and Yule.

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